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Extra resources for A History of Indian Literature - Vol. V: Scientific and Technical Literature (Part II) - Fasc. 3: Indian Poetics

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214, for a more textual approach. 112 Classical Indian theorists, concerned with the inward force of the language itself could not reasonably be expected to dwell on accidental conventions of an already conventional language. 244 E. Gerow • Indian Poetics svabhdvokti113 can be resolved. It is a figure (agreeing with Dandin) but of an essentially different sort than those captioned by vakrokti (agreeing with Bhamaha). The force of the fourfold classification leads us to define as vastava, figures that involve neither simile nor hyperbole (thus occupying the polar position to Mesa, which involves both).

I t is accepted that if a pun involves no more than a span that can be read as two separate utterances (whether this be by redivision of the words109, or rereading the same words in different senses110) it is is a sabddlamkdra' since its distinctive characteristic is based on a grammatical rather than a rational or propositional feature. Rudrata is apparently the first to observe explicitly 104 But this hyperbole can be confused with utpreksd, for the exaggerated verbpredicate can easily suggest another subject.

Instead of "manner" based on the presumption that all concrete "meaning" (or content) is indifferent to the modes of its apprehension (a common sense view that holds the univocal proposition "I love her" not different in content from its poetic counterpart, the poem), we argue content; and it is asserted that the one content that can never be apprehended through a declarative or denotative utterance is precisely that^hat had heretofore been reserved to the study of ndtya as its differentia) the emotional response to the work of art, the rasa.

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